In Memory of

William Katzenstein 1902 Tuscon

Jack Boleyn 1910 Tuscon

J.D. Sullivan 1929 Phoenix

Ambrose Shea 1929 Phoenix

Terry Anderson 1932 Kingman

Eddie Koury 1946 Holbrook

Fred L. Van Camp 1946 Tucson

John Owens 1947 Mesa

Winston West 1947 Mesa

Herb Reggin 1956 Prescott

Dean (Red) Marshall 1970 Rural Metro

John Spradling 1971 Rural Metro

John O. Campbell 1973 Kingman

William L. Casson 1973 Kingman

Joseph M. Chambers III 1973 Kingman

M.B. “Jimmy” Cox 1973 Kingman

Alan H. Hansen 1973 Kingman

Frank S. “Butch” Henry 1973 Kingman

Roger A. Hubka 1973 Kingman

Christopher G. Sanders 1973 Kingman

Arthur C. Stringer 1973 Kingman

Donald G. Webb 1973 Kingman

Richard Lee Williams 1973 Kingman

Randolfph J. Potts 1974 Phoenix

Lester Hillis 1974 Glendale

Walter D. Kelson 1977 Phoenix

Chauncey E. Ray 1977 Phoenix

Floyd Eugene Mason 1977 Peoria

Edward Bell 1979 Tucson

Dale R. Lockett 1979 Phoenix

David Deary 1979 Fry

Edward J. Gaicki 1980 Tempe

Herman Peyton 1983 Parker

Ricky S. Pearce 1984 Phoenix

David Franks 1984 Phoenix

Samuel M. McAnally 1984 Tucson

Jack Robert Stevens 1986 Mesa

Gary Robert Peters 1987 Mesa

Richard Y. Garza 1987 Willcox

James Martz 1989 Eloy

Robert F. Million 1991 Avra Valley

L. Wayne Struble 1992 Williamson Valley

Calvin Morris 1992 Mayer

Timothy J. Hale 1994 Phoenix

Ronald Erwin Holmgreen 1994 Lake Havasu

Bret R. Tarver 2001 Phoenix

Carl Shoemaker 2001 Mesa

Darrell “Ricky” Thomas 2001 Somerton/Cocopah

Gary Archibeque 2004 Show Low

Robert Kotowski 2005 Flagstaff

Valeree Claude 2005 Pinetop

Corey Lawton 2006 Gila River

Mark Stevens Carter 2007 Phoenix

Keith Dawson 2008 Flagstaff

John Delaney 2008 Mesa

Mark A. McNeal 2009 Flagstaff

Eric Tinkham 2009 Queen Creek

Frank J. Molina 2009 Salt River

Dennis W. Robinson 2010 Three Points

David J. Irr 2010 Yuma Rural Metro

Brad Harper 2013 Phoenix

Andrew Ashcraft 2013 Prescott

Robert Caldwell 2013 Prescott

Travis Carter 2013 Prescott

Dustin DeFord 2013 Prescott

Christopher MacKenzie 2013 Prescott

Eric Marsh 2013 Prescott

Grant McKee 2013 Prescott

Sean Misner 2013 Prescott

Scott Norris 2013 Prescott

Wade Parker 2013 Prescott

John Percin, Jr. 2013 Prescott

Anthony Rose 2013 Prescott

Jesse Steed 2013 Prescott

Joe Thurston 2013 Prescott

Travis Turbyfill 2013 Prescott

William Warneke 2013 Prescott

Clayton Whitted 2013 Prescott

Kevin Woyjeck 2013 Prescott

Garret Zuppiger 2013 Prescott

Thomas R. (Tom) Quesnel 2014 Tucson

John F. Jayne 2014 Mesa

Bobby Mollere 2014 Hellsgate

Crystal Rezzonico 2017 Phoenix

Scott P. Ferguson 2017 Rural Metro

Mark (Bo) Boulanger 2018 Chandler

Joshua W. Eugin 2018 Saint David

Richard Anthony Telles 2019 Phoenix

Nikki Imm Sullivan 2019 Mesa

Brian John Beck, Jr. 2019 Phoenix

Austin M. Peck 2019 Goodyear

Tommy Arriaga 2020 Tempe

David Mathis 2020 Phoenix

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I am just so proud of our amazing team!!!! ... See MoreSee Less

I am just so proud of our amazing team!!!!

www.facebook.com/1185673497/posts/10224769909373502/?extid=0&d=nAnd just like that…Team Longballers is 2-0 so far at the United States Police & Fire Championships 🥎 💥

Keep up there hard work and bring those gold medals back to Arizona! 🥇

#softball #uspfc #azffathletics #arizona
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https://www.facebook.com/1185673497/posts/10224769909373502/?extid=0&d=n

PFFA To Legislators: Don't be reckless on state budget, funding for public safety.

From our press release this morning:

PHOENIX – As the Arizona Legislature works to pass a budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1st, the Professional Fire Fighters of Arizona urges lawmakers to proceed with caution, especially when it comes to adequately funding public safety for the year ahead. Bryan Jeffries, President of the PFFA, cautioned that an overreliance on one-time federal funds flowing to the state – coupled with overzealous tax cuts – could put municipal-level funding for fire fighters, police, paramedics and public safety at risk in the future.

“I can’t emphasize enough how squeezed public safety has been across Arizona as we work the frontlines of the pandemic and wrestle with funding issues in many cities and towns,” said Jeffries. “Now is not the time to be reckless when it comes to the state budget, the revenues our municipalities rely on and keeping our communities safe.”

Jeffries pointed to a June 5, 2021 memorandum issued by Rounds Consulting Group as a source of responsible ideas for the upcoming budget. The Rounds analysis suggests that state revenue figures may be inflated by the massive influx of federal dollars flowing to Arizona to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. To account for the one-time nature of these federal funds, Rounds suggests that any tax cut passed by the Legislature need not “be based on permanent changes to the tax rates. A portion can be one-time taxpayer rebates.”

Jeffries urged lawmakers not to drastically overhaul the state tax code, slashing revenues to cities, towns, counties and public safety agencies, based on federal largess in response to the pandemic.

“To the extent our state has a revenue surplus, yes, some of that savings can and should be passed along to individuals and businesses – but it should also be used to pay down the debt our state has accrued,” said Jeffries. “Given the unpredictable nature of 2021 and the months ahead, taking a conservative approach makes sense – especially because the federal government’s increased funding could dry up at any time.”

Like Rounds, Jeffries expressed concern about the $930 million education debt known as the K-12 rollover, the $422 million the state owes on the leaseback of its office buildings and the $2.8 billion in pension debt held by the Public Safety Personnel Retirement System.

“Paying off debt now saves money for future budgets,” said Jeffries. “That’s the conservative approach here and it will ensure we have a budget that does everything it can to support keeping the public safe.”
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If they can afford that ridiculous cyber ninja audit they can cut down more money here.

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The inception of the PFFA came about as a successor to the Arizona State Firemen’s Association, which was founded in 1924. During that time, Tucson Chief Joseph Roberts was the head of the Firemen’s Association. Interestingly enough, activists in that original organization were mostly chiefs and the organization was open to all firefighters, professional and volunteer. One key activist in the AFSA was Phoenix Deputy Chief, Jake Siken.